Junior eco-warriors dig in

Aug 11th, 2015 | By | Category: Hot Topics, Latest News
Share

Thirty, budding, Tamahere School eco-warriors today dug into Tamahere’s latest conservation project – the public reserve below the Allan Turner suspension bridge.

Tamahere School students and supporters dig in

Tamahere School students and supporters dig in


Supported by parents and teachers and guided by members of the Tamahere-Mangaone Restoration Trust the hardworking students spent a morning planting 240 trees below the bridge and alongside the Mangaharakeke Stream.
Students gather to hear that their work will restore native plants and birds to Tamahere

Students gather to hear that their work will restore native plants and birds to Tamahere


The working bee began with briefings about the restoration and its aims of restoring a largely lost eco-system in the Waikato, and the appropriate techniques for successfully planting the native plants.
Tamahere-Mangaone Restoration Trust member John Sheat, right, gives a planting lesson

Tamahere-Mangaone Restoration Trust member John Sheat, right, gives a planting lesson


The junior eco-warriors got down with gusto to their tasks of digging holes, dragging reluctant plants from pots, settling them into their new positions, and covering them with soil and the carpet squares, which will suppress weeds and retain moisture.
Planting was done with real enthusiasm

Planting was done with real enthusiasm


The banks were steep and the stream bank muddy but nothing deterred their enthusiasm for the job done in sunshine on an otherwise chilly day.
The reserve was a hive of activity

The reserve was a hive of activity


Trust members Leo Koppens, John Sheat and Peter Morris, who have added the new restoration project at the end of Woodcock Rd to their original work in the Tamahere Reserve on Tauwhare Rd, were delighted with the hardworking efforts of the students and their supporters.
The Mangaharakeke Stream bank is getting a new look

The Mangaharakeke Stream bank is getting a new look


The event was also supported by HEB Construction, which funded the plants as part of the requirements of its resource consent for the Waikato Expressway to create new areas that will ultimately be suitable for habitats for the rare native bat.

Update: Saturday, August 15

A second, community working bee was held in the reserve this week when the Tamahere Lions lent their efforts to clearing blackberry and other weeds under the Allan Turner bridge.

Tags: ,

One Comment to “Junior eco-warriors dig in”

Leave a Comment