The day the world changed

The day the world changed our far flung family got together on a WhatsApp group and traded thoughts, photos and the usual friendly ribbing.

In Vancouver, Katikati, Mt Maunganui, Hamilton and Tamahere spirits lifted for mums and dads, cousins, nieces and nephews, kids, grandkids and grandparents. Gosh that was only yesterday!

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Life with coronavirus

The impacts of the highly infectious novel coronavirus Covid-19 are spreading throughout our local community and New Zealand.

We will all know people whose health is at risk or whose jobs and incomes, businesses, life or travel plans have been affected.

We will all need to be alert to ways we can support our family, friends and communities in the days, weeks and months ahead. Here’s a start for what we can do in Tamahere.

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Food choices that lie

Our nearest supermarket has reorganized its stock and now has a healthy food aisle.

Under the psychology of supermarket layout this health food corral is right next to the fruit and vegetable section’s airy spaces, which are designed to lull shoppers into a relaxed if not mindless state in order to part them from more of their money.

But if the fruit and vegetables and corralled items are designated healthy what does that say for the rest of the supermarket stock? Less healthy? Not healthy? Junk food?

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Book makes case for tolerance

Tamahere author Nicky Webber has made a strong plea for tolerance in her first book No Ordinary Man.

Webber, a former journalist, tells the story of Mick Thompson, a young, World War II soldier who is forced by the times and intolerance to hide his true nature.

A brave soldier who fought in Egypt, Tunisia, Syria and Italy and gained the rank of sargeant, Thompson was also a cross dresser.

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Grumpy readers claim cards

Disgruntled Tamahere and Matangi readers are going letter in hand to claim their last year of access to Hamilton city libraries.

Southern Waikato district residents who are regular users of Hamilton libraries have until September 30 to get a last 12 months of access after the Waikato District Council cut its funding of the long running arrangement.

The end of the deal has prompted a storm of protest, a line of grumpy district patrons at Hamilton libraries, and a petition (included) but little response from the district council.

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Cheap deal not on the books

The Waikato District Council wanted a cheaper deal for access to Hamilton city libraries, a move that axed the long running deal and caused an outcry.

District Council chief executive Gavin Ion told Tamahere Forum the Hamilton City Council didn’t agree with the proposed fee cut “so the negotiations ended unsuccessfully.”

But one city councillor maintains the district has ditched a good deal which was being subsidised by the city.

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Library cut “short term”

It botched the message and is actively working toward greater access to libraries not less, says one Waikato district councillor on the library debacle.

Waikato District Council councillor Dynes Fulton told Number8Network recent changes to access to Hamilton city libraries for Waikato district residents are a short-term move.

“This is all part of a process of council working towards developing a Waikato regional library facility for all,” said the Hukanui-Waerenga councillor who is also deputy mayor.

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Cr replies to library “passion”

Tamahere councillor Aksel Bech has responded to the “very passionate and plentiful” outpouring following the Waikato District Council’s axing of resident’s access to the Hamilton city libraries.

In a lengthy reply to comments on this and other stories, and on social media, Bech wrote that “clearly the arrangement giving access to Hamilton’s libraries for the southern part of WDC (Tamahere and Matangi particularly) is dearly valued by many.”

“This was never in doubt and many, including myself, hold the view that as WDC ratepayers we actually need more and better access to library services locally.

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Size matters – for books but not votes

Size matters, according to Waikato District Council chief executive Gavin Ion.

One of the reasons for controversially ending the council’s contract paying for district residents’ access to the Hamilton city libraries “is that it only benefits a small percentage of our residents,” he said in a statement today.

What percentage is too small to warrant the expense of allowing Waikato residents who are miles from a district library the ability to use one on their doorstep? He doesn’t say.

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